May the best bird win: how the 2019 voting system has changed

This year’s Australian bird of the year poll is going to a runoff. What does that mean for your favourite?

Cast your vote in bird of the year 2019 here

In the 2002 French presidential election, voters on the left were lumped with an unpalatable choice: vote for their longtime conservative enemy, Jacques Chirac, or abstain but risk handing the election to the far-right candidate, Jean-Marie Le Pen. Progressive voters did their duty and reluctantly lined up at ballot boxes to cast their vote for Chirac, who was re-elected with a record 82% of the vote.

This turn of events doesn’t on face value seem an endorsement of the runoff system, especially when Le Pen had just 17% of the primary vote and Chirac just 20% in the first round. Together the pair had less than 50% of the vote.

Related: Australia’s birds: pretty and sweet or just a pack of bastards? | Sean Dooley

Related: ‘Magpies are the sound I remember most’: bird-watching with Paul Kelly

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Source: The Guardian
May the best bird win: how the 2019 voting system has changed