‘We want to keep our forest’: why Guyana's wilderness needs visitors

A community-run wildlife tour shows how tourism can help preserve a remote rainforest and introduces visitors to a stunning array of fauna and jungle vistas

I’m sitting atop a red granite boulder with Rovin, my guide. Below us is a billowing green expanse of jungle broken only by the sinuous line of a river and a low range of hills, one of which we are seated on. There is no sign of humanity: no smoke pillars, no clearings, no masts or buildings, not even a jet trail across the sky. Instead, there’s a formation of six red-and-green macaws, cackling as they go, and in the nearby fig tree the flitterings of tiny, jewel-like birds in splendid emerald and sapphire livery.

Related: Guardian climate pledge 2019: ‘With air travel, it’s best to take a flexitarian approach’

Absorption of CO2 by Rewa rainforest estimated at 200 tonnes per square kilometres per year (see the rainfor.org).
350 sq km x 200 = 70,000 tonnes

Related: Argentina’s Impenetrable forest opens up

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Source: The Guardian
‘We want to keep our forest’: why Guyana's wilderness needs visitors